The House at 7 Harbour Hill

The only place I’ve ever seen a street address on a headstone is Cobh. Quite a few of them had an address, perhaps this is common in Ireland? On one particular stone, it was the same address mentioned in the 1923 obituary of my 3rd great-grand aunt Anne Mann

“Widow of John Mann, Carpenter. Chronic Nephritis. Daughter Mary E Mann present at death. 7 Harbour Hill”

This was a new address, Anne had lived at 36 Harbour Row in most of the records I’d seen. When we visited Cobh in February, one item on the to do list was to try to find graves for any Mann, Lucey or Walsh family members. There is no map or burial listing for St. Colman’s Cemetery, so we walked the rows looking for familiar surnames. I did the genealogy happy dance when I found this one (in my mind of course, I don’t dance and I was in the middle of a graveyard).

Mann headstone, St. Colman's Cemetery, Cobh, Ireland

Mann headstone, St. Colman’s Cemetery, Cobh, Ireland

Mary Ellen is the daughter of Anne mentioned in the obituary. Elizabeth is another daughter and pretty much my favorite person in the Mann family. She traveled back and forth from Cobh to America and lived with the Lucey’s in Haverhill and Groveland Massachusetts and left a wonderful paper trail. She is the reason I know that there was still family in Ireland! I didn’t know that she married (Fred Fryer in 1922) or that she had come back to Cobh after Fred died.

Who are Yvonne Wallace and Kate Buckley? What’s the connection to 7 Harbour Hill? We left the cemetery and walked back to town, passing by Harbour Hill to get a look at the house. Above the window is a painted sign that says “Buckley.”

7 Harbour Hill, Cobh, Ireland

7 Harbour Hill, Cobh, Ireland. There is nothing like the evening sun in Cobh, just beautiful.

With these clues, additional research uncovered that Mary Ellen and Elizabeth’s sister Anne married Thomas Buckley in 1910. They were living at this address in the 1911 census. Thomas was a house painter, his father was a builder and the sign above the window was an advertisement for the family businesses. Apparently sometime after 1911 Anne’s mother and sister moved in with them at 7 Harbour Hill.

Kate Buckley was Anne and Thomas’ daughter, she was a nun at the Carmelite Convent and died at the Bon Secours Home in Cork. Thomas and Anne had several other children according to some unconfirmed information, still working on that. I think one of the children still has living descendants in Ireland, potential distant cousins!

Yvonne Wallace was the infant daughter of the folks that lived at 5 Harbour Hill, not related as far as I’ve been able to find.

Thanks to Cork-based genealogist Margaret Jordan for her help locating obituaries and vital records to document these connections. I highly recommend her services and look forward to working with her again. More to come on the other discoveries she helped me make…

Ireland Trip – Templerobin Cemetery, Cobh

In February we visited Ireland for the second time. In 2002 we went with the kids, this time it was just Sue and I. In the 13 years between trips, I’ve learned a lot about who my Irish ancestors were and where they were from, but there are always more mysteries. James Lucey and Mary Walsh were married in Cobh in 1841 and they had five children there, including my 2nd great-grandfather James, before leaving for America in 1853.

I have a million things to write about the family in Cobh. I learned so much over the past six months about them thanks to Margaret Jordan, a Cork-based genealogist that Sue hired for me as a Christmas present (Best. Present. Ever!) as well as visiting and walking the graveyards there.

More to come on what I found out, but I wanted to share some photos of the Templerobin Cemetery in the Ballymore section of Cobh. This cemetery is where my Walsh ancestors are interred, possibly some Lucey’s as well. We met with local David Verling who showed us around the cemetery. David is part of a community group that took ownership/responsibility for the cemetery after it had been left derelict for many years. His group has done an amazing job cleaning up the overgrowth and documenting any readable headstones. Not much is left in the way of records, so the efforts of preservation here were needed badly. I do have a copy of the transcriptions and I’m happy to do lookups, just email me (contact info on the About page). I eventually hope to digitize the data and make it public, with the permission of those that created it of course.

So, here are some of the photos, all photos copyright me, if you want to use one just ask.

IMG_1489 IMG_1488 IMG_1487 IMG_1486 IMG_1485 IMG_1484 IMG_1482 IMG_1481 IMG_1479 IMG_1478 IMG_1474 IMG_1472 IMG_1471 IMG_1470 IMG_1468 IMG_1464 IMG_1463

Me and David Verling at the  Cobh Heritage Center

Me and David Verling at the Cobh Heritage Center

 

Lucey – Ireland DNA Project

I’m very excited to announce the creation of the Lucey – Ireland Y-DNA surname project at Family Tree DNA.

The project uses Y-DNA test results to find matches between participants with the goal of encouraging the use of genetic genealogy to prove relationships and hopefully determining the townland of origin in Ireland of the various Lucey families.

Any male Lucey worldwide is invited to join.

Y-DNA follows the paternal line, so usually aligns with the surname which allows us to compare the various Lucey families to each other. If you are unfamiliar with Y-DNA and/or Family Tree DNA, I’d highly recommend reading Y-DNA basics and viewing the Introduction to Family Tree DNA webinar.

If you are a male Lucey or know one, please share the project details with them and contact me with any questions at luceydnaproject at eluceydator.com.

The One That Stayed 52 Ancestors: #12 Anne Lucey Mann

When my Lucey’s came to America in 1852 they left daughter Anne in Ireland, she was probably only 10 years old. I wonder why she stayed, perhaps she was sick and couldn’t travel. And who she lived with, did some other family members remain? I only found out about Anne because her daughter Elizabeth came to America and stayed with family in Haverhill and Groveland, Massachusetts (censused as “niece” in 1900 and 1910). From Elizabeth’s passenger records, I was able to find Anne and her family in the 1901 and 1911 Ireland Censuses.

The Cover Page of the 1901 Ireland Census for the Mann family

The Cover Page of the 1901 Ireland Census for the Mann family

The family lived at 36 Harbour Row in Cobh or Queenstown as it was known then, in County Cork. Some additional location info is also captured on the form including:
Barony: Barrymore
Parish: Templerobin
Townland: Kilgarvan

In the 1901 Census the family consists of:

John, age 61, a carpenter born in London
Anne, age 49 [this might be 59], wife, born in County Cork
Mary Ellen, age 29, dressmaker, born in County Cork
Anne, age 20, dressmaker, born in County Cork

In 1911, things have changed a bit. Anne is now a widow and there’s a son listed, John age 38 that wasn’t listed with the family in 1901. An additional question was asked in this census, number of children born and living, to which Anne answered 9 and 7 respectively. I know of only 4 children, Mary, John, Elizabeth and Anne. So more research to do there, sounds like a good reason to visit Ireland again!

1911 Ireland Census Mann
John Arthur Mann, Anne’s husband, died 27 Feb 1906 and is buried in Templerobin Cemetery in Cobh. Son John is also buried there, he died 16 Feb 1935. I don’t have any additional information on Anne or her daughters. I’m hoping there are some descendants out there, please contact me via comment or email if you are connected.

This post is 12th in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge series.

[1]  National Archives. Census of Ireland, 1901/1911 [http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie]. Dublin, Ireland.

Amanuensis Monday – 1896 Letter

Transcription of a letter from my 3rd Great Grandfather, John Cornelius Donoghue to his daughter Johanna (wife of James E Lucey). Johanna had been in America about 25 years at the time of this letter. Transcribed by me from a photocopy of the original letter.

Shronaboy Jan 7th 1896

Dear Daughter,

             I received your welcome letter and xmas present in due time for which I am more than thankful for.  I suppose I have not deserved as much from you as I never gave you anything but you know I thought more of you than any of the others and I tried to keep you with myself. 

            Johannah I am very glad to know that yourself, husband and family are in good health and going well a blessing which I hope you all will enjoy for many years to come. Now as for my going to America, I am too old and I suppose I would not live to reach you so I think it would not be worth my while to carry my old bones to a foreign country as I have not long to live, at best I am 80 years old.  I am thankful for your kind offer and there is nothing would please me better than to be with you but it is to(sic) late now.  I was glad to here (sic) that Hagerty is getting on well now.  I was sorry he should have met with any difficulties he was always kind to me and never forgot me.

            Now about your sister’s children the ages of Kate’s are from 20 years down to 9 and Norah’s about the same.  I will send you a more accuret (sic) account of them the next time I write you.  They are getting on nicely and if anything don’t occur that I am not aware of they will for some time to come.  This was a very good year for the farmer’s they had very good crops and a fair price for cattle and sheep butter is low but is bringing a better price lately. The country is the same as when you left is the people generally live better but everything else about the same.  Potatoes 2 shillings 6 pence per peck of 147lbs butter 1 shilling per lb meat 8 pence per pound for beef and mutton pork 6 pence flour 21 shillings per 224 lbs meal 15 shillings per bag of 280 lbs the prices of the different things are gon down and in many instances the rents are reduced some but not enough to corispond with the fall in prices.

            Now I cannot think of any more to tell you this time, hoping those lines will find all of you enjoying the New Year in good health and spirits

            I remain your fond father

                        John C. Donoghue

                        Shronaboy, Glenflesk, Co. Kerry Ireland

(Good bye write soon)